In and Around Hannibal, March 8

Oops — when I make a mistake, I does it good!

I am very sorry for any confusion I might have caused with my column last week. Don’t know whether it’s me eyes or me mind (I’m losing a little of each), but somehow I pushed the wrong button on this fool computer and sent the column from the first of March LAST YEAR instead of this year.

I will try to not do that again.  Apology said and I hope accepted, I give you this week’s offering!

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I hope you enjoyed the series on Hannibal schools before centralization. Have you drawn any conclusions?

Our forebears were anxious for their children to get an education…and getting a school in their area for their children was important. Can’t help thinking that that translated down to their children.

If for no other reason than school provided a place for them to see their friends and gave them something to do besides chores. Children must have led isolated lives with only siblings for company, compared to youngsters of today,

The parents were involved with the school doing what they could to make it a go, from providing land and building the school to providing firewood and boarding the teacher.

I imagine the teacher was not reluctant to pay a visit at a pupil’s home if he or she felt one was needed.

In the earliest days, schools were able to schedule classes as they felt needed as many of the students would be needed to work the farm.

You could say there was a lot more ‘local control’ and a lot fewer mandates and financial aid. Maybe they went to school only in the winter when they wouldn’t be needed on the farm. The teachers were freer to teach what they felt the students needed than they are today.

Many schools were used for church services – as the churches were used years later for schools when they were building schools or additions to them in later years.

These little schools produced some outstanding people, from lawyers and doctors and teachers to elected officials as well as shopkeepers and skilled artisans, farmers and homemakers.

Education goes in cycles and all things are made new again eventually. I spoke recently with a retired teacher who said they tried to overcome the ‘bigness’ of their school by a  cluster approach – Hannibal over the years has done similar things.

Isn’t it interesting that we wanted bigger to provide a better education for our children, expose them to the things that only a bigger school could provide and then we struggle to fine ways to give those big schools, the small school feeling — the feeling of belonging, being really cared about and of being held accountable.

Ah … If we only had the answers!

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The Senior Meals Program meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday for lunch at the Senior Center promptly at noon. The center opens at 10. For those who don’t know, the Center is located in the Library Building, across from the Firehouse on Oswego Street.

This week’s menu features:

Monday, March 10 — homemade soup and sandwich, crackers, juice, fruit cocktail

Wednesday — Goulash, vegetable, juice, pineapple tidbits

Friday — Crispy fish clipper, Monterey potatoes, vegetable blend, juice, peaches

Activities:

Monday — Wii bowling; come cheer them on!

Wednesday — Bingo after lunch

Friday — games

Give Rosemary a call and make your reservation, 564-5471.

Can you believe spring sports begin today at Hannibal schools?

Bone Builders don’t take the winter off – they meet at the American Legion at 9:45 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. If you have osteoporosis, there is help for you and your bones – stop in and check it out, or give Louise Kellogg a call.

The Elderberries will meet at noon Tuesday at the Senior Center for a covered dish luncheon. Please bring your own table service and a dish to pass.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meets at Our Lady of the Rosary (Cayuga Street) at 5:45 p.m. Wednesday.

The Hannibal Board of Education will meet at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, March 12 in  the high school board room.

The nominees for the Library’s Woman of the Year are: Donna Blake, Linda Ford,  Christine Bortel Learnord, Kim Heins, Carol Newvine, Linda Remig, Lenore Richards and Shelly Stanton.

Voting will be open at the library until March 15, and the reception for the winner will be 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 22.

The Hannibal Methodist Church serves a free lunch (donations for this ministry accepted) at 11:30 a.m. Thursdays. Don’t eat alone, come on down and join the fun and fellowship. The church is one block west of the Village Square on Route 3.

Lenten Services of the Enoch Thomas Cluster of United Methodist Churches have begun. All services start at 5 p.m. and are on Sunday.

March 9 at Martville

March 16 at Little Utica

March 23 at Ira

March 30 at Hannibal Center

April 6 at Bowens Corners

On Sunday April 13, Palm Sunday, they will all be taking part in a Choir Festival at Hannibal.

The Tri-County Singers will perform their Easter Cantata at 2 p.m. Sunday March 30 at the Hannibal United Methodist Church.

ZUMBATHON to benefit Upstate NY chapter of ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) will be held 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday March 26 at Hannibal Village Chapter. For more information call 564-5266 or 564-5479.

There are a number of families in the Hannibal area dealing with ALS. Even if you don’t Zumba, come out and support these families.

The Senior Council would like to remind you its rooms are available for groups and family rental when not being otherwise used. Give Rosemary a call for information and booking (564-5471.).

The Friends of the Hannibal Free Library will hold their Spring Book and Bake Sale Saturday and Sunday April 5 and 6. Starting now, anyone wishing to  donate books should drop them off at the library at the front desk anytime the library is open.

The Church World Service Truck will be making it’s way to Central NY to pick up school, baby, and hygiene kits and clean-up buckets on April 30.

If your church or group puts these together they can be delivered to CWS Regional headquarters at 200 A Gateway Park Drive, North Syracuse before April 30. Call Amy or Christopher at 458-8535 to make an appointment so you don’t find the office closed.

News flash – just heard they are in special need of school kits. Last year more than 57,000 school kits were provided for children in need in the U.S. and overseas including young survivors of flash floods in Garrett, Ky., the Black Forest Fires in Colorado and Superstorm Sandy in Jamaica, NY.

A school kit consists of 70-page spiral notebooks, blunt metal scissors, 12-inch rulers, hand held pencil sharpeners, large erasers, new pencils with erasers, box of 24 new crayons and a 12×14 tote bag with cloth handles.

If you would like to donate supplies for these kits, donatons are always appreciated.

I will be heading to Maryland March 18 to pack shipping boxes. If you have kits ready, I’ll be happy to take them. Give me a call or send me an e-mail.

Rita Hooper

706-3564

Twohoops2@juno.com

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