Mexico Point Park to hold Severin Bischof art show

Art show in Mexico – Friends of Mexico Point Park are hosting an art show featuring Severin Bischof’s watercolors and wood cuts. Friday, Aug. 9 at 7 p.m. will be opening night with a wine and dessert gala. There will be an admission fee. The show will continue Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 10 and 11 from 1 to 4 p.m. There is an admission price as well.

Art show in Mexico – Friends of Mexico Point Park are hosting an art show featuring Severin Bischof’s watercolors and wood cuts. Friday, Aug. 9 at 7 p.m. will be opening night with a wine and dessert gala. There will be an admission fee. The show will continue Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 10 and 11 from 1 to 4 p.m. There is an admission price as well.

Friends of Mexico Point Park are hosting an art show featuring Severin Bischof’s watercolors and wood cuts.

Friday, Aug. 9 at 7 p.m. will be opening night with a wine and dessert gala. There will be an admission fee.

The show will continue Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 10 and 11 from 1 to 4 p.m. There is an admission price as well.

This is a fund-raiser for the maintenance and restoration of Casey’s Cottage. Those seeking reservations may call 963-7657 or email Betty at bj2green@aol.com.

Bischof, a master painter, was born in 1893 in Germany where he apprenticed and began is art career. He learned to restore religious paintings and worked in the great cathedrals in Europe.

He also learned the art of cutting glass and was a decorative painter of furniture.

In 1928, Bischof was an art student at Syracuse University, and later worked for Syroco, an ornamental woodworking company.

While at Syracuse University, he met Dr. William Casey and began what became a lifelong friendship.   Dr. Casey, a sociology professor at Columbia University, summered at Mexico Point Park.

The unused carriage house at Mexico Point was transformed into Casey’s Cottage by the two close friends. Casey provided the means and Bischof provided the designs.

The art show will feature the artwork of Bischof including his woodcuts and pastels of his vision for transforming the carriage house into Casey’s Cottage.

According to John Bischof, the artist’s son, “The cottage was a work of love, a place of beauty, friends, companionship and good conversation only.”

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