Fishing halibut

Leon Archer

Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

I have been wondering if the numerous heavy rains we have had this year will show up in a smaller crop of young turkeys.

I’ve been watching for birds as I have traveled here and there during the last month, but all I have seen so far has been two nice toms and one lonesome hen.

It’s getting to be time that some of this year’s broods should be in fields and alongside roads. I would be interested in hearing from readers about what they are seeing or not seeing as far as turkeys go. Is it going to be a lean year?

I have been seeing plenty of deer and quite a few fawns. The red summer coat certainly makes deer stand out in contrast to the green fields, more so I think than any other time of year, even winter.

It’s pretty hard to miss the summer deer, because there are not very many other things of that particular hue in the outdoors.

I was talking with Frank Maurer a few days back. He was about ready to make a trip to Alaska to go halibut fishing with a friend. I envy him. While fishing halibut is hardly an exciting kind of fishing, when one is successful the rewards are wonderful. Fresh caught halibut is a treat no matter how it is prepared for the table.

Don’t get the idea that I don’t enjoy halibut fishing, I do. One doesn’t troll for them or fish them with flies; although, it’s possible to catch them either of those ways, but one would really have to work at it and put a lot of time in.

Fishing a big chunk of cut fish on bottom is the most common way to target these big flat fish. Heavy metal jigs are successful as well, but working one of those babies all day is a chore I am no longer interested in doing.

A halibut when it is hooked puts up a dogged fight, but he doesn’t make long runs nor does he charge to the surface and get a person’s heart pumping with spectacular jumps.

He will do his best to stay on the bottom, trying to scrub the offending hook off or to tangle the line on an obstruction. Usually the bottom where halibut are found has few things to tangle on. If it did, the halibut would win a lot more often than he does, because a big halibut has a mountain of power when it is first hooked.

Fighting a halibut is mainly lift and crank as the heavy boat rod flexes with each thrust of the halibut’s wide tail and points to the bottom.

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