CNY weather

CNY weatherby Roy Hodge

Here I am, thinking and wondering what I could write my next column about. I am also thinking, “It is closing in on the middle of January and it’s raining out.” I am also thinking, “It’s not supposed to rain in January; in January, it’s supposed to snow.”

It really was raining out and it was raining quite hard; not like a summer rain storm with all the thunder and lightning, but it was definitely rain – not snow. But it did seem a little strange; after all, it is January, not July.

It seems like here in Central New York, no matter what the season is you can’t depend on the weather being like it was a year ago, or what is supposed to be this time of year.

Last year on January 12, we weren’t getting much snow – less than 13 inches for the season. The year before, we had received over 80 inches of snow by that date.

But last year, it started snowing the next day – January 13 – and  our total in Syracuse was up to 20 inches for the season. But remember, we got quite a break last year. From first to last snowflake last year, in Syracuse we accumulated about 50 inches of snow for the entire season.

Last year, I checked with John Florek, superintendent of the Fulton Water Works, April 27 to ask about Fulton’s final snowfall figure for the winter of 2011-12. John corrected me quickly. “As of yesterday,’ John said, “the total snowfall was 108.2 inches, and we received a trace overnight.”  John reminded me, “It has snowed here on Mother’s Day.”

It is another year, it is raining in January, but we never know what to expect. As I am sitting here and thinking about rain in January and wondering what I could write a column about, maybe I could write something about the unusual weather.

That sounds very familiar.  Perhaps I have written about that before.

*  *  *  *  *

While writing last week about the binder of 1901 Patriots that ended up in my possession, I used the word convoluted in the following sentence: “It seems that the file came to me through a convoluted route from the Fulton Public Library after the pages were transferred to microfilm.”

Convoluted is a word that occasionally pops into my mind, which I have interpreted as being complicated. Usually, when I have used that word I apparently used it without thinking too much about it.

But this time I guess I thought about it too much – so much that I decided to change that part of the sentence to read; “through a somewhat indirect route,” etc.

I found definitions of convoluted in “The Random House” dictionary and on the internet – difficult to comprehend, involved; having many twists and curves; involved, intricate; example: “a convoluted explanation that left the listeners even more confused than they were before.”

That’s funny – that seems to be exactly what this little adventure has done for me.

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